Future Candidate School: Training Conservatives to Win
Natalie Tuttle
March 6, 2016
Future Candidate School: Training Conservatives to Win
If you knew the formula for winning, would you run for office?In January, thirty-four individuals attended the Leadership Institute's Future Candidate School. Some of them were declared candidates in their state or local races. Others were planning congressional runs and the remaining few had just begun to contemplate a run in the future.If you haven't considered running for office, you should. Running doesn't require thirty years of political experience or a few million dollar donors willing to sponsor you. With the right tools and training, anyone can learn to win at LI's Future Candidate School (FCS).For four days, attendees focus on building a base, raising funds, identifying voters, and recruiting volunteers. The faculty roster included political consultants, media coordinators, fundraising gurus, and even a current U.S. Congressman.The intensive training also focused on personal and political preparation for a career in elected office.Day 1: Are you ready to run?Because running for office means more than showing up to events with a smile and a wave, FCS started out with a session examining your ability to enter a race. George Landrith, president of Frontiers for Freedom, helped students examine their past and present, looking for signs of trouble. In the second session of the day, attendees learned that running for a higher office can be a full-time job with plenty of overtime and candidates have to be sure their finances are stable at home.To help candidates decide if running is right for them, Congressman Alex Mooney answered questions candidly about the role and responsibility of the candidate.The rest of the day focused on preparing your network and recruiting volunteers to your cause as well as making sure you have a positive media presence on the day you announce your candidacy.Day 2: So you decide to run. Now what?So now that our candidates have decided to run, they should develop a persuasive message. Leadership Institute Vice President of Development Steve Sutton worked through recent election messaging to demonstrate the impact proper use of messaging can have on a campaign. Nancy Bocskor reiterated the importance of messaging during her presentation on storytelling, emphasizing communicating effectively.In addition to crafting your message and sharing it with your voters, you also should reach out to existing groups and coalitions in your constituency. These coalitions may be able to provide volunteers and maybe even connect you with good candidates for campaign staff. Quality campaign staff do vital work to ensure your campaign is functioning efficiently and legally.Day 3: Getting in isn't even the hard part.Winning the race is the goal of every campaign, but what about staying in the race? You can't win the race if you can't pay your bills. Make sure you have the budget to remain a viable candidate.Competitive candidates have had to suspend their campaigns because they lacked the funds to keep the lights on. Don't be one of those candidates. Future Candidate School teaches candidates that their number one responsibility is fundraising. Staff and volunteers can get your name on the ballot and they can rally the voters, but only the candidate can raise money from donors. Day 4: Acting the part.On the final day of Future Candidate School, Dr. John Shosky, president of Roncalli Communications, Inc, spent the entire day with attendees, coaching each student through communication and messaging techniques. Beginning with introductions and ending with elevator speeches, students were led through a series of exercises to increase their confidence and improve their interpersonal skills. To be successful, candidates have to be versatile. Different situations call for different communication styles. Students were given tips on everything from posture to intonation. After drafting rough speeches, Dr. Shosky gave each student short critiques and advice to take away from the training. These guidelines are meant to improve the impression that a candidate will make in the first three seconds of meeting a potential volunteer, voter, or donor. Those thirty-four individuals walked away from the Leadership Institute's Future Candidate School with the formula to win. Will they run? Time will tell.To learn more about the Leadership Insititute or to sign up for a training go to LeadershipInstitute.org. >
CPAC 2016 Activism Boot Camp
Carol Wehe
February 26, 2016
CPAC 2016 Activism Boot Camp
American Majority and Leadership Institute are pleased to release the final agenda for the CPAC 2016 Activism Boot Camp, running Wednesday, March 2 – Friday, March 4, during the Conservative Political Action Conference in National Harbor, MD.On Wednesday, attend one of three tailored tracks—Student Activism, Community Activism, and Campaign, Data and Tech—as well as top-notch training sessions on Thursday and Friday. Note: The CPAC Activism Boot Camp is included in your regular CPAC 2016 conference pass. Wednesday Student Activism TrackWednesday, March 2, 2016, 1pm-5:30pm, (Chesapeake A-C)1:00 pm How We Reached 1 Million Students in 2015 (and How You Can, Too): Charlie Kirk, Turning Point USA1:45 pm “You Have to See This!”: Causing a Stir with Viral Videos: Caleb Bonham, DCO Consulting2:30 pm Changing Campus Culture: Summer Ratcliff and David Blair, The Leadership Institute3:15 pm There's No Such Thing as a Safe Space: Keeping Campuses Free: Catherine Sevcenko, Foundation for Individual Rights in Education4:00 pm Winning Student Elections: Scott Ellis and Micah Pearce, American Majority 4:45 pm Get Hired in Campaigns and Politics: Evan Stewart, Campaign Hunter5:30 pm Adjourn followed by Activism Boot Camp Reception, open to all Activism Boot Camp attendees Wednesday Community Activism TrackWednesday, March 2, 2016, 1pm-5:30pm, (Chesapeake D-F)1:00 pm Community Organizing in a Post-Obama World: Matt Robbins, American Majority 1:45 pm How to Beat the Left at Their Own Game: Brent Gardner, Americans for Prosperity2:30 pm The Latino Vote: The Beginning or the End of the Conservative Movement?: Mike Madrid, GrassrootsLab3:15 pm Social Media: How to Become the Digital Activist Every Movement Needs: Aubrey Blankenship, American Majority4:00 pm The Wisconsin Model: A Five-Year Fight: Matt Batzel, American Majority4:45 pm Not Running? What YOU Can Do to Influence an Election: Chris Doss, Revolutionary Communications5:30 pm Adjourn followed by Activism Boot Camp Reception, open to all Activism Boot Camp attendees Wednesday Campaign, Tech, and Data TrackWednesday, March 2, 2016, 1pm-5:30pm, (Chesapeake 4-6)1:00 pm Campaign Messaging: How to Come Across in a Me-First World: Jessie Nicholson, Wisconsin Women's Council Board Member1:45 pm Setting and Reaching the Right Vote Goals: Steve Sutton, The Leadership Institute2:30 pm What Is Political Database Technology and How Will It Help?: Chris Littleton, Voter Gravity3:15 pm Social Media, SEO, and Campaign Branding: Use It or Lose It: Austin James, SOLVE 4:00 pm Say Goodbye to Clipboards: How to Run a Campaign from Your Smartphone: Ned Ryun, American Majority4:45 pm Money Made Easy: Campaign Fundraising: Rachael Robertson, American Majority5:30 pm Adjourn followed by Activism Boot Camp Reception, open to all Activism Boot Camp attendees #CPAC 2016 Activism Boot CampThursday, March 3, 2016, 10am-4pm, (Chesapeake D-E)10:00 am Bridging the Divide Between Veterans and Politics: Seth Lynn, Veterans Campaign10:30am Talking to Minority Voters: Making the Case for Conservatives Nationally: Mike Madrid, GrassrootsLab11:00 am If Reagan Ran Today: What 2016 Activists Must Learn from Reagan's Leadership Style: Peggy Grande, The Quiggle Group11:30 am The Best Campaigns of Last Cycle and What You Can Learn from Them: Tayt Brooks, American Majority1:00 pm Become the Press: Oliver Darcy, The Blaze1:30 pm Grabbing the Spotlight: How to Generate Earned Media: Matthew Hurtt, Grassroots Leadership Academy2:00 pm Face-to-Face Still Matters: How to Win the Day with Personal Interaction: Matt Batzel, American Majority2:30 pm Reaching the Female Youth Vote: Alexandra Smith, College Republican National Committee3:00 pm Engaging Millennials: Whitney Neal, Bill of Rights Institute3:30 pm Know Your Enemy: Opposition Research: Alexandra Angel, America Rising PAC #CPAC 2016 Activism Boot CampFriday, March 4, 2016, 10am-1pm (Chesapeake D-E)10:00 am Conservative Talk Radio: Rational Thought and the Average Joe: Andrew Wilkow, Host of the Wilkow Majority on SiriusXM Patriot10:30 am Heat and Light: Making Government Accountable and Transparent: Josh Mandel, Ohio State Treasurer11:00 am How to Get-Out-the-Vote with Digital: Kurt Bardella, 0ptimus / Endeavor Strategies11:30 am You Get What You Measure: 10 Ways to Evaluate Your Lawmaker: Jessica Anderson, Heritage Action12:00 pm How to Win the Room: Public Speaking Success: John Tsarpalas, Commonwealthy.com 12:30 pm The New Journalism: Citizen Journalists: Kevin Glass, Franklin Center>
The Science of Fascination
Kyle Baccei
November 24, 2015
The Science of Fascination
Last Wednesday the Leadership Institute hosted its biweekly webinar and the topic was fascinating. Peggy Grande visited LI studios to discuss the science of fascination during the free live webinar Lead, Live, and Be Fascinating.Peggy had the opportunity to work with one of the most fascinating individuals in history -- Ronald Reagan. She began the webinar discussing how her work with Reagan shaped her perspective on the science of fascination. What made him uniquely fascinating and why are we still analyzing his life and leadership? What can we learn from his life that we can apply to our own?Peggy answered these questions and offered insight into this iconic leader. She told us about the secrets to his effectiveness. How the life and presidency of Ronald Reagan can guide you and I toward greater personal success and shapes us professionally to be our best self.President Reagan was truly a fascinating man, and the lessons you and I can learn from his unique personality certainly make us better people.But still, I wondered, what makes me the most fascinating person? Sure, Ronald Reagan was fascinating and how he used his natural qualities to his advantage was great. But, how do I do this? What makes me different and how do they make me the most valuable to others? Peggy had the answer. Whether you are looking for a new job, moving up in your current career, or changing careers, it is essential to know how you uniquelyadd value. Trying to be “better” or “more” rarely works because it is subjective and constantly changing. Instead, she suggests you find out what makes you different and then you should become more of that. This was truly a fascinating webinar. Learning what makes each of us different, and then using that as an advantage, makes us unique in the work place. To hear Peggy talk about the science of fascination click here. It will be fascinating, I promise.For more information on webinars email Carol@LeadershipInstitute, or check out LI's training calendar to find the next live webinar.The Leadership Institute offers over 44 types of training programs, working with more than 1,582 conservative student groups, and helping employers connect with conservative jobseekers. Since the Institute's 1979 founding, LI has trained more than 170,116 conservative activists, students, and leaders. Graduates include members of Congress, state legislators, local officials, media personalities, and conservative organization leaders. For more information, please visit: www.LeadershipInstitute.org.>
Launch into 2016 as a Campaign Manager
Thomas Bingham and Angel Chitnatham
November 19, 2015
Launch into 2016 as a Campaign Manager
This has been another good year for conservatives who took Leadership Institute (LI) training. In 2015 alone, 161 conservative activists took a Campaign Management School. These graduates are people looking to get involved in their community. They want to be leaders and make changes to their cities, counties, and states by winning elections -- for conservative principles.After hours of lectures, these graduates left with the ability to organize a campaign -- from the moment the campaign begins to Election Day. Better yet, LI grads learned what they have to do from day one to win and affect the public policy process.“I will be forever grateful for the knowledge and specialized training I have received at the Leadership Institute. LI is at the forefront of the current conservative revolution and I am proud to be a part of it,” said Florida resident James White, a recent Campaign Management School graduate.Tori Whiting of Michigan said the March training was “a great way to get conclusive and in-depth training on campaigning.” Ron Ferguson of Ohio said his June participation in LI's Campaign Management School was “the launching pad to being prepared for a campaign."These graduates understand in order to win being trained by the experts is the key to success. But 2015 isn't over yet. There is one last chance to attend a Campaign Management school in 2015.There is still time to join these graduates and get prepared for your next campaign.Mistakes happen, but Leadership Institute graduates know how to respond because they have training. They know how to have an effective strategy. The Campaign Management School teaches just that. And regardless of your political experience, the expert faculty will get you ready for day one of your next campaign.Each training day brings on a new lesson plan that will equip you with the basics to achieve success.Day 1: “Develop a winning campaign plan and strategy”Day 2: “Target and identify your voters effectively”Day 3: “Learn how to raise funds for your cause” Day 4: “Develop effective ads and protect your candidate's image”Join LI next month at the Campaign Management School, December 1st through December 4th and learn how to run your own campaign big or small. End the 2015 season with some inspiration and the know-how to take your race to the next level.Email Angel at AChitnatham@Leadeshipinstitute.org for more information on the training or register for the December Campaign Management School here.The Leadership Institute offers over 44 types of training programs, working with more than 1,582 conservative student groups, and helping employers connect with conservative jobseekers. Since the Institute's 1979 founding, LI has trained more than 165,206 conservative activists, students, and leaders. Graduates include members of Congress, state legislators, local officials, media personalities, and conservative organization leaders. For more information, please visit: www.LeadershipInstitute.org.>
When campaigns are prepared, good things happen
Kyle Baccei
November 5, 2014
When campaigns are prepared, good things happen
Prepared candidates do not panic. They have a plan. The Leadership Institute (LI) identifies, trains, and places conservatives who are prepared, and they win races. Many won in 2014 alone.“I am so proud of the work Morton Blackwell has done over the past fifty years to build a winning conservative movement,” said David Fenner, Vice President of Programs at the Leadership Institute. “Last night, Leadership Institute trained candidates, staff, and volunteers worked hard and smart in local, state, and federal campaigns in all fifty states. Despite staying up most of the night, Morton gave the following remarks to at our 8:00 a.m. Wednesday Wakeup Club Breakfast this morning.”  "The most appropriate thing for me to say this morning is thank you to the donors of the Leadership Institute, because the good that you enable us to do has a long-term impact," said Morton Blackwell, President of the Leadership Institute.Join me in congratulating all of the Leadership Institute graduates who ran in, worked on, and volunteered on campaigns.>
DC Summer Interns Get Trained
Ali Kudlick
June 30, 2014
DC Summer Interns Get Trained
Last week 84 conservative DC summer interns gathered at the Leadership Institute to learn the secrets for a successful internship.Experts on everything from networking and résumé writing to dressing for success addressed interns and provided tricks of the trade and personal experiences.Steve Sutton, vice president of Development at the Leadership Institute, began the training by advising interns to develop the “Four P's of Excellence: philosophical, political, professional and personal.”Knowing what you believe in is good, but it isn't sufficient. “You owe it to your philosophy to know how to win,” said Steve, famously quoting Morton Blackwell, LI's president. The rest of the day was dedicated to learning how to win through professional and personal excellence.Vice President for Strategic Communication at Wise Public Affairs Laura Rigas posed the question, “What does success look like?” She gave practical advice on knowing your leadership style, developing personal mission statements and defining your personal brand. She emphasized self-awareness in combination with specific measurable goals.“I feel equipped and better prepared to excel in Washington this summer and in the future,” said Austin Pendergist, intern in the office of Congressman Mark Sanford (R – SC).Interns from across the city had the chance to not only listen, but also to ask questions of the speakers as well as a panel of recruiters who work for political organizations around town. “Opportunities fall into your lap sometimes and you have to be ready for them,” said Lauren Wills, scheduler and intern coordinator for Congressman Thomas Massie (R – KY).“LI's Conservative Intern Workshop was a practical how-to guide for every conservative intern in Washington,” said Elizabeth Green, who is interning at the Franklin Center for Government and Public Integrity.>
Breaking Records & Boundaries to Take LI Training to Your Living Room
Carol Wehe
May 8, 2014
Breaking Records & Boundaries to Take LI Training to Your Living Room
The Leadership Institute broke the all-time webinar training record for live attendees during the April 25 webinar Growing Your Digital Reach featuring lecturer Ericka Andersen, The Heritage Foundation's digital media manager. One hundred eighty-one conservatives watched this live lecture online to learn how The Heritage Foundation connects with so many people, and how other conservative groups can grow their digital reach through email lists, multiple social media platforms, friends, allies, and giving back online.Click the picture to the left to hear The Heritage Foundation's Digital Media Manager Ericka Andersen speak about growing your digital reach.Twitter Abuzz About #LIwebinarSome attendees took to Twitter to live tweet Ericka's lecture. The Franklin Center of Government & Public Integrity's Outreach Manager Chris McCoy (@ChrisYMcCoy) tweeted one point she learned, “DON'T automate! Don't hook the same exact messaging to FB Twitter Instagram etc #LiWebinar Be Real.”America's Future Foundation (@AFF) told their followers to watch: “Happy Friday! Want to learn the secrets of growing your digital reach? Join @LeadershipInst today for a free webinar!"Karin Davenport also thanked LI saying, “Thx for the @LeadershipInst webinar today! As Comm Dir. of @USEnglishInc, it gave us lots of great new ideas!”Tweeted from behind the scenes in the control room at LI Studios, this picture to the right shows Ericka Andersen wrapping up her popular lecture on growing your digital reach, and Paulo Sibaja reading through the many attendee questions on twitter and email.Video LibrarySince 2011, the Leadership Institute has trained 3,450 attendees through free live webinars online, taking training to conservatives everywhere, from their living rooms to their offices, and with their local campaigns and tea party groups. After airing live, LI archives webinars and makes them available through the Leadership Institute's Online Video Library. Click below to see the archive of LI's recorded webinars.Watch the Leadership Institute's archive of recorded webinar trainings in any of these categories – Activism, Campaign, Campus, Career, Communications, Fundraising, and New Media. These webinars are free thanks to LI's generous donors and faculty, who give their money and time to make LI training possible. Generous Leadership Institute donors make webinars available at no cost to activists because they believe in training the next generation of conservative leaders. LI's speakers, experts in their respective fields, generously volunteer their time and expertise because they, like the Institute, want to increase the number and effectiveness of conservative activists in the public policy process. As LI President Morton Blackwell says, “Political technology determines political success.” >
Leadership Memo: No, you may not just quit
Mike Rothfeld
October 1, 2013
Leadership Memo: No, you may not just quit
Rather than a piece by me to begin this Leadership Memo, I've decided to run a “guest editorial” by my friend and fellow Leadership Institute Board member Mike Rothfeld.Mike took LI training 28 years ago and has had a successful career as a political activist, a campaign consultant, a direct marketing consultant, and a conservative organizational entrepreneur. He frequently serves as a volunteer faculty member at Leadership Institute training schools and runs good training schools through one of his own, separate organizations, Foundation for Applied Conservative Leadership. He sent the below piece as an email to graduates of his own training, and I believe all principled LI graduates would benefit from reading his advice. Cordially,Morton BlackwellNo, you may not just quitBy Mike RothfeldThis email is only for folks who are in a position of leadership and/or responsibility, or intend to be in such a position one day. If you are not in either group, you may stop reading ... and ask yourself why you are on this list. Now, before I go further, I want to make something clear: The title does not apply to you if you are quitting because of a serious health issue, a crisis within your family or to maintain those who depend upon you financially. Your health, family and finances come before activism. This is not only proper, it is prudent. Activists who fail to keep their priorities straight destroy themselves or their family, or burnout, or all three. With that out of the way, let me re-state the title -- NO, YOU MAY NOT JUST QUIT. It does not matter that folks were mean to you (e.g. 2012 RNC Convention from beginning to end), cheated at the meeting (e.g. RNC Convention on the floor over Rules, Credentials and Roll Call), beat you in an unfair fight (e.g. 2012 RNC Convention in Credentials Committee), beat you in a fair fight (e.g. RNC Convention in Rules Committee [not counting the bus hijacking]) or ... anything. I do not care. People Look to You for HopeThere is no way around the fact that trying to defend and restore liberty and life is slow, hard and all-too-often heartbreaking work. You often will lose, fairly and unfairly. Even when you win, it often will seem pyrrhic or incomplete. And there is always another fight, another project and another assault to be handled. And so when you feel that powerful desire to chuck it all (and you WILL, probably over-and-over -- I sure have, as has virtually every one of my peers), consider how those around you probably feel. And they probably do not have your passion, vision, determination or training. If you quit, most of them will too. And if you quit from a position of responsibility or leadership that they promoted or supported you for, you will add treachery to your achievements. And You Don't Get to Reject Your Training EitherNow, in the dark times, even if you will not quit, you will face another, similar, temptation -- to switch trains. You know your training, and why you are doing what you are doing. You know why you should not waste time with 3rd parties, initiative and referenda, toothless resolutions and fantastical fix-it-all-in-one-move schemes (like a Limited Constitutional Convention). But suddenly, when the hard, correct path looms thick with obstacles and enemies, these softer, sillier approaches will lure you again. And they will sweeten their poison with this whisper "you are not quitting or selling out, you are just changing trains." And it is a lie. You are quitting. So What Do I Do When it Just Feels Like Crap?I am not going to insult you by saying "suck it up." Mostly folks who never really have been tested spout that advice. It may work for a few people, and it may work for you sometimes. But I think it likely that, sooner or later, it will not be enough. So I will give you the best advice I have heard; advice I have taken a number of times. It comes from Dr. Tony Evans, a well-known and respected (and loud) evangelical preacher out of Dallas, Texas. Dr. Evans was addressing Christians who were called by God to a particular work and were doubting they were still called to it. Although Dr. Evans was teaching Christians doing explicitly Christian work, his advice is clear. Dr. Evans said, "Continue doing what you knew you were clearly called to do until God clearly calls you to do something else." This means you trudge forward in the work you are doing (and it may take every ounce of will to take each step for a long period of time), unless there is concrete proof you must do something else. And, most of the time, you will find that there is nothing else; the dark period fades and the clarity, hope and, yes, even joy that brought you into the fight returns. James 1, 2-4: My brethren, count it all joy when you fall into various trials, 3knowing that the testing of your faith produces patience. 4But let patience have its perfect work, that you may be perfect and complete, lacking nothing. Peace and ... Best regards, Mike RothfeldPresidentFoundation for Applied Conservative Leadership © 2013 All Rights Reserved, Reprinted by permission.101 Washington StreetFalmouth, VA 22405kks@training4liberty.org>
6 takeaways from LI's High-Dollar Fundraising School (Day 1)
Kyle Baccei
September 30, 2013
6 takeaways from LI's High-Dollar Fundraising School (Day 1)
The first day of the Leadership Institute's Comprehensive Fundraising Training -- a week-long bootcamp in raising funds for campaigns and causes -- kicked off with a full day at the High-Dollar Fundraising School.If you couldn't make it, don't worry. Below are the key takeaways I learned from each speaker. More to come throughout the week.-----You can't thank your donors enough.Carsten Walter, Development Director of the Heritage Foundation, opened the training by answering the question: why do people give you money? He explained the keys of donor communication and the importance of saying thanks.Other key points:--> People give because of a cause. Ask donors about an issue and then about how passionate they are about that issue.--> Send a thank-you note to donors and thank them multiple times.--> After you thank you donors, let them know where their money went.-----The five elements of asking donors: simple, unexpected, concrete, creditable, and have emotion or stories.Ian Ivey, who works for the General Service Administration but has a long background in the conservative movement, taught attendees how to create a case for giving -- and how to make it stick.Other key points:--> Your goal is to persuade donors that what you are doing is valuable to them.--> A good "pitch" follows the same checklist: simple, unexpected, concrete, creditable, and have emotion or stories. -----Fundraising in-person or over the phone is your most cost-effective way to raise money.Nancy Bocskor, Founder of the Nancy Bocskor Company, explained to students how to raise money person-to-person, to know when to ask for money, and to know what to avoid.Other key points:--> When you're making an ask, you have 21 seconds to make your impression.--> The results of personal solicitation are immediate. Anytime you call someone rather then send them direct mail your response rate will go up five times.--> When you're asking for funds, you need to have a firm greeting, engage in small talk, make a good sales pitch, and then close the deal. -----One person can only meet so many people -- so it's important to raise money with tools like direct mail.John Davis is the Director of Donor Communications at the Leadership Institute. He talked about the benefits of having a high-dollar direct-mail fundraising program.Other key points:--> The response rate to your first letter will be around 2%. But that's alright. Your goal is to build a core group of donors.--> Don't worry about getting a "no."--> Build relationships with your donors. Make your communication as personal as you can. It's okay not to ask for money. -----Your fundraising campaign must have a mission statement that is short and to the point. It creates energy and urgency.Karla Bruno is the Director of Foundations and Corporate Relations at the Leadership Institute. She taught attendees how to use capital campaigns to help their organizations grow.Other key points:--> Capital campaigns can super-charge your fundraising program when they tap into urgency. A sense of urgency in politics is phenomenal.--> The Leadership Institute's expanded its Campus Leadership Program into new office space with multiple elements of a successful capital campaign: a clearly defined mission, a sense of urgency with a deadline for action, and a video appeal with endorsements from conservative movement leaders, including Grover Norquist and Governor Mike Pence. -----Don't treat your donors as if you're meeting them for the first time.Dick Patten, the CEO of Patten and Associates, explained to attendees how they could upgrade their donors.Other key points:--> Remember: working with your donors is about their needs and wants, not yours -- theirs. Provide engagement in all your communications with them.--> Ask your donors for their input on a report card. Look at what's been accomplished and what needs to be done.--> Create a strategic plan for upgrading donors with dates, actions, benchmarks, and goals.Kyle Baccei is the Communications Manager for the Leadership Institute. Follow him on Twitter (@KyleBaccei).>
5 Things You Learn During Your First Few Weeks of a DC Internship
Katie Johnson
July 22, 2013
5 Things You Learn During Your First Few Weeks of a DC Internship
Intern season is here again in the DC metro area!During the summer students and young professionals from across the country and all over the world descend upon the District, a.k.a. Hollywood for political junkies, hoping to jump-start their careers.Thirteen lucky interns, me included, have the opportunity of a lifetime: interning with the Leadership Institute this summer!No matter what organization interns work for in the DC metro area, whether it be on the Hill, a non-profit, or a private company, interns are sure to learn a great deal during their time in the DC.Working at the Leadership Institute has been no exception. Below are some basic things I've learned during my first few weeks as an intern!.*Be prepared to fail, but learn your lesson and don't make the same mistake twice—Interns are new to the office. They can and will make mistakes. During one of my first weeks, my supervisor gave me directions on how to refill the coffee maker, which I completely forgot. Later a fountain of coffee came flowing out of the coffee pot and all over the kitchen counter. Always listen to your supervisors: the advice and directions they give are there for a reason.*Stay optimistic and have a can-do attitude— Sometimes you will be put in high-stress situations and will certainly be required to multitask and juggle directives from several different bosses and intern coordinators at once. Don't be afraid to lighten the situation with a joke or two (appropriate, of course). Always make the best of your situation and stay positive! Be willing to face challenges head on; don't complain, and your hard work will pay off in the end.*Social media: it's a blessing and a curse— Some jobs, including mine, require the use of social media. That's awesome! Young people today are all about Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. However, you are still working so be sure to balance your social media usage with time delegated to other tasks. Prioritize—some tasks need to get done immediately, while others, such as a Facebook post or a tweet, can get done later, or can be scheduled ahead of time using awesome programs such as Hootsuite or Buffer.*Watch your spending – This applies to internships in any city, not just DC. When you're not working, you have a vast array of entertainment choices: events, concerts, restaurants, shopping, food trucks, museums, etc. However, city life is expensive! Know your limits when it comes to spending and also take advantage of discounts whenever possible. In DC there is always another happy hour, intern appreciation week, or free networking luncheon. Take full advantage of these free and inexpensive events and be smart with your finances.*Be Concise and Direct—Know what you want and ask for it in the shortest and most concise way possible. People are willing to help you if you ask for help, but you need to do it in a way that isn't verbose. This applies to everything from writing e-mails to co-workers to asking for an extended lunch so you can attend that policy briefing. Just remember to keep it simple. >
The 22Q: Jarrett Ray, Director of Online Fundraising at The Prosper Group
Abigail Alger
May 15, 2013
The 22Q: Jarrett Ray, Director of Online Fundraising at The Prosper Group
Enjoy the 22Q with Jarrett Ray, Director of Online Fundraising at The Prosper Group.The 22Q is an informal interview series (archives here) with young conservatives, connected to LI, who are working in the public policy process. The 22 questions ask them to explain what they do, and how they see politics and the next generation of the conservative movement. Their opinions are their own, and are not endorsed by the Leadership Institute.---Part 1: What I doHow I describe my job in 10 wordsDeveloping and executing online fundraising plans for GOP candidates and organizationsMy day-to-day at work...in three sentencesI spend the majority of my time writing and designing emails, online ads, and websites. A team of designers and developers helps me bring these ideas to life.I oversee an account manager and intern who mock up and execute online campaigns faster than most staffers can say social media.I couldn't do my job withoutA to-do list. My obsession with to-do lists is a running joke in my office. I've literally used a napkin in order to stay organized.Most important moment in my career (so far)Consulting on Mitt Romney's email prospecting effortsUnexpected skill that has helped me the mostA sense of adventure. I've been on the ground with political campaigns in six states and worked on races in dozens of others. Every campaign is an opportunity to learn about local issues and meet new people.The best advice I have receivedRather than ask questions first, always try your best to figure it out. Part 2: PoliticsThe biggest change I've seen already in politicsThe explosive change in public opinion polls on gay marriage is fascinating. I remember in 2006 when Virginia Republicans placed a marriage amendment on the November ballot as a way to help George Allen's reelection campaign. There is a lot to be learned in how gay rights activists pulled it off.The element of working in politics that most surprised meEveryone says time management is really important. They're right.The most important issue many don't see yetState and local Republicans have increasingly published back against the federal government's largesse. I think you will see a push toward more local control as a way to counter Washington overreach.Where I think the movement will be in five yearsThis is more of a trend, but online/mobile advertising will be more important than TV ads.How I formed my political beliefsI'm naturally conservative, but my activism was sparked in college in reaction to a professor who graded me down for taking a conservative stance on an opinion paper. The situation caused me to dive into political philosophy classes and take a leadership role in College Republicans. Part 3: The next generationWhat I'd say to my 18-year-old selfYou don't need to be a political science major to work in politics. You will get all the experience you need volunteering on a campaign or interning for your local state senator.(For the record, I double-majored in college and graduated with degrees in Political Science and Philosophy.)Skill or experience I'd recommend students get nowHone your writing skills now. The ability to effectively communicate opens up a lot of doors.To gain experience, write op-eds for your college paper or volunteer on a campaign and offer to assist with their social media campaign.Three things I'd tell every young political junkie to read1. Set up an email account for political emails and sign up for emails from politicians of all stripes.2. Drudge Report.3. The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good by William Easterly. The focus of the book is on international development, but Easterly's realist conservative approach provides real-life examples of how to apply complex free-market ideas.My most useful class in collegeIntro to Political Philosophy. The class opened up a world of interesting thinkers to me.I met some of my closest friends (from both sides of the aisle) in that class too.Three future leaders from my generationHopefully someone reading this gets the tools they need at the Leadership Institute to start a career and become a future leader. Part 4: Me, personallyThe most fascinating figure in world historyGeorge WashingtonMy heroes in fictionWalter von Ulrich from Fall of Giants.I really love Ken Follet novels. He is a master of historical fiction.The most inspiring art I've read, seen, or heardHike to the top of a mountain and take a picture. You can't find art better than that.I'd star in House of Cards or West Wing (choose one)West Wing. Aaron Sorkin might be a liberal, but he is a great writer.I can't get through my day withoutPandora, Bose headphones, and Stride gumMy connection to the Leadership InstituteAt James Madison University, I brought the Leadership Institute to campus to give its Youth Leadership School.I went on to take the Campaign Manager, Internet Activist, and Grassroots Campaign Workshop -- all excellent. Thank you everyone who participated in the #LIJobFair #VVS13— Leadership Institute (@LeadershipInst) October 12, 2013>
The 22Q: Gabriella Hoffman, Twitter Activist and LI Staffer
Abigail Alger
April 30, 2013
The 22Q: Gabriella Hoffman, Twitter Activist and LI Staffer
Enjoy the 22Q with Gabriella Hoffman, conservative activist and Regional Field Coordinator at the Leadership Institute.The 22Q is an informal interview series with young conservatives, connected to LI, who are working in the public policy process. The 22 questions ask them to explain what they do, and how they see politics and the next generation of the conservative movement. Their opinions are their own, and are not endorsed by the Leadership Institute.--- Part 1: What I doHow I describe my job in 10 wordsWorking with students to advance conservatism on campus is rewardingMy day-to-day at work...in three sentencesChecking my email; updating our database with student contacts; reaching out to students via phone call, Facebook, or email; eating; talking with co-workers; researching and finding liberal bias.I couldn't do my job withoutSunny optimism. I try to be positive and happy all the time. Challenging the left can be daunting, so I try to make the best of things handed my way.Most important moment in my career (so far)Being mentioned on the Rush Limbaugh Show for an interview I did for FoxNews.com on January 11, 2013. He mentioned my thoughts about payroll tax expiration. I was in disbelief! My dad, a huge Rush fan, called me the moment he heard my name on the air. It was amazing.Unexpected skill that has helped me the mostI would say that multitasking has helped me the most. Juggling many things can be difficult at times, but it has proven to be beneficial in the work IThe best advice I have receivedMy dad once said, "In order to be equal, you have to be three times better than the rest." My parents taught me to work hard, to enjoy the fruits of my labor, and to be the best individual I could possibly be. Part 2: PoliticsThe biggest change I've seen already in politicsThe rise of political correctness and cultural Marxism. Too many people are easily offended and afraid to stand up for their beliefs out of fear of being ostracized. It's time to put bullies in their place.The element of working in politics that most surprised meWhat a small world conservative politics is. You meet people who know your friends or people who have some connection to you. It can be a curse or it can be a blessing.The most important issue many don't see yetThe threat of revisionist history. Whenever historical facts are twisted or misrepresented, people are taught to resent and equally despise this country. We cannot forget our past and allow lies to define our future.Where I think the movement will be in five yearsIf we continue to be conservative and push actual reforms, our movement will be successful. If we continue down this path of caving and moderation, we're doomed to be obsolete. There's already one leftist movement in America. We don't need another one.How I formed my political beliefsMy parents are Lithuanian immigrants who fled the Soviet Union. Therefore conservatism came naturally to me. Embracing collectivist or Marxist viewpoints was strictly forbidden in our house. Conservatism best encourages freedom and opportunity. Part 3: The next generationWhat I'd say to my 18-year-old selfI'd say that it's good that we kept our principles and didn't listen to detractors. Many people wanted me to fail, and I wouldn't let them have it. I tell my students and fellow conservative to never give up on their principles or change their views.Skill or experience I'd recommend students get nowSocial media. It's imperative for students to acquaint themselves with Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, and similar media.Three things I'd tell every young political junkie to readGod and Man at Yale by William F. Buckley, the Drudge Report, and Counter CulturedMy most useful class in collegePolitics of the Middle East. My professor was a founder of the Political Science Department at the University of California at San Diego. He was fair and gave an accurate account of the Arab-Israeli conflict.I learned a lot about the Middle East thanks to his class. I learned to help students battle anti-Semitism and anti-Israelism on campus.Three future leaders from my generation1. Katie Pavlich, Townhall.com News Editor2. Charles Johnson, investigative journalist and author of Why Coolidge Matters3. Ryan T. Anderson, Heritage Foundation Fellow and co-author of Why Marriage Matters Part 4: Me, personallyThe most fascinating figure in world historyWinston ChurchillMy heroes in fictionEdmund Dantes of Alexander Dumas' The Count of Monte Cristo and Jay Gatsby of The Great GatsbyThe most inspiring art I've read, seen, or heard"Waterlilies" by French Impressionist painter Claude Monet. His countless paintings of waterlilies are captivating.I'd star in House of Cards or West Wing (choose one)House of CardsI can't get through my day withoutChatting it up with my coworkers. A healthy work environment is key to one's success at any job. A happy workplace makes for a happy employee!My connection to the Leadership InstituteI'm currently the Northeast Regional Field Coordinator. Prior to working at LI, I went to a Youth Leadership School in February 2010 and completed a TV training in summer 2012.>
Eight Rookie Mistakes to Avoid on the Campaign Trail
Ron Nehring
April 24, 2013
Eight Rookie Mistakes to Avoid on the Campaign Trail
If you're doing your job as a candidate or party leader, you're going out speaking with a lot of people you haven't met before. When they don't know much about you, it's human nature to make quick judgments based on what little information they do have.First time candidates, particularly for local office, often send signals that undermine credibility among potential supporters, costing them votes, volunteers, donations, or all three.People make decisions based on cues and signals, and initial impressions can have a lasting impact. Here are eight unforced errors you can easily avoid.Loner = loser. Speaking at the Chamber of Commerce lunch? Showing up by yourself tells everyone you have no supporters in the room. Instead, arrive with a volunteer whose job it is to accompany you while you're chatting with people, helping in taking down notes for follow up, and carrying endorsement cards. When working a crowd and confronted with that weirdo who wants to chew your ear off about privatizing sidewalks, have your body man leading you, setting up the next person to talk to, and politely motioning you to the next person when he sees you're pinned down. Bonus: Let a member of the group you're speaking to know you're coming, and have him meet you at the door when you arrive and walk in together to show other members you have support already.Flag ties. Ronald Reagan was a great American patriot, and he didn't have to prove it by wearing a flag tie — a novelty that you should probably put up on eBay. Want to show your patriotism? Wear a small flag pin on your lapel. Cheap-o pens. “Ok, let me write your number down.” While you're writing, the person standing in front of you is looking straight at your hand. If it's holding a two year old Bic with the end chewed off, you don't look as impressive. Mont Blanc gets $450 for a pen not because it doesn't matter, but because it does. Yours doesn't have to break the bank, but a proper pen sends a subtle signal you have your act together. FREE OFFER! Business cards. Companies like Vista Print have nice offers for “free!” business cards using very generic templates that people like me who meet candidates a thousand times have seen – about a thousand times. While you're at it, have Vista put “I'm not taking this race seriously enough to invest in sending the right message to donors, volunteers, and stakeholders.” Spend a few bucks more on proper business cards that show you mean business.“I lost weight!” shirt collars. So you dropped 20 lbs walking all those precincts – fantastic! But if you don't trade in those collared shirts for ones that fit your new neck size, you're going to look like an anorexic or an addict, and your sloppy appearance will show in all those photos posted to Facebook.Bush or Clinton era shoes. Look down right now. If those shoes weren't purchased during the Obama Administration, take them off, put them in the closet, and wear them for gardening. When you're at events, it's surprising how often people are looking down. High end Hugo Boss isn't required, but they should be new and clean.Dark button-down shirts. If you're wearing a black button-down shirt, a tie and a blazer, congratulations, you look like a bouncer at a bar. Ditch the Sopranos look for now and go with a white or light blue shirt. Still have doubts? Turn on C-SPAN. See any elected officials with your bouncer costume? Exactly.Rookie@gmail.com. That's the message you're sending with your “I'm using this email address until I lose” Gmail or Yahoo account. For $10 at GoDaddy.com you can register your own private domain name, then sign up to have email to that address forwarded to your regular email address.For women candidates: no question about it, you have a tougher job than the boys when it comes to attire. The press pays more attention to what women leaders wear, just ask Hillary Clinton. Yet in most cases, the target audience consists of voters and stakeholders, and not the press, so don't worry about the writeup. Rule of thumb: middle of the road. Too flashy or too mannish and you'll turn people off. Not too much jewelry and definitely not too much perfume. If you hug someone and they can smell of your Chanel an hour later, it was too much. More food for thought in this New York Times story – The Fashion Conservatives.People are careful with where they invest their vote, their time, and their money. Switching from amateur to pro before you hit the field helps you maximize the return on every hour you're putting into your campaign. Ron Nehring is a volunteer faculty member for the Leadership Institute, where he speaks at LI campaign management schools and activists workshops all across the country. Under Ron's leadership as the former chairman of the Republican Party of California, they raised more $73 million, permanently retired over $4 million in debt, and instituted a wide array of management and financial reforms. He currently serves as a consultant and is the chairman emeritus of the California Republican Party. Read his full bio here.This “Expert Insights” article is a part of a regular series which delves into the mechanics of political technology. LI staff, faculty, graduates, and conservative friends are welcome to submit an article by contacting Lauren Day at Lauren@LeadershipInstitute.org>
Your Brand Online
Carol Wehe
April 18, 2013
Your Brand Online
Your online content is how many people judge you these days.I Google strangers all the time to find information about them. What used to be creepy is now the norm.Make sure your online brand shows others what you want them to see. Here are the bare necessities:- LinkedIn – get a profile, fill it with your expertise, and connect to as many friends and professional contacts as possible. It's not a very active site (read – you only have to do something with it when you change jobs or learn a new skill), but LinkedIn is the best way for people to browse your professional expertise and network.- Twitter – hey, I'm in new media. If you have a twitter account, post about what you're interested in, and also what you claim expertise in – and keep it up to date.- Facebook – it doesn't have to be public, but keep the public part of your profile at least semi-professional looking. Make sure your profile pic, cover photo, about you, and favorite quotes sections are things your boss could see – because she can.- Blog –use Wordpress or Tumblr to make your blog look nice for free. And remember – like everything else online, act like the world is judging you by your content – because it is.And side note – use a first and last name sort of email. The world looks down on supergirl@aol.com sending professional emails.So, go out there and show the world a better you – online.>
108 Conservatives From 30 Countries Get Trained in England
Miguel Moreno
April 11, 2013
108 Conservatives From 30 Countries Get Trained in England
Fundraising is not just about asking for money, but about developing relationships with people who share your vision and want to be your partners in bringing change to society. Your donors are not just a source of money -- like a bank machine -- but partners, so keep them informed about the progress you are making and let them know how their contributions are helping. These were a few of the main concepts in Morton Blackwell's opening speech at the sixth annual International School of Fundraising held at the beautiful Wellington College in Berkshire, England.Over four days, 108 people from 30 countries and four continents, met at Wellington College from March 26 to 30. Seventeen renowned experts in fundraising, from the US, Europe, and Latin America, delivered 35 lectures teaching vital skills necessary to succeed financially as a political leader or as an organizational entrepreneur. Social entrepreneurs learned how to:Build strong donor relationsDevelop fundraising strategiesPlan effective fundraising eventsUnderstand online fundraisingAdapt fundraising methods to their home countriesSpeakers included major players in the field such as Morton Blackwell, Bruce Eberle, Stephen Clouse, Rick Hendrix, Kevin Gentry, Justin Murff, Brian Davis, Katherine Eberle, Ron Nehring, and Alejandro Chafuen, and Silvio Dalla Valle from Italy, Mathias von Gersdorff from Germany, Tim Evans and Matthew Elliot from England, and Jose Antonio Ureta from France.While the day was packed with a lot of learning, after dinner, students congregated at the on-campus pub for networking and sharing stories. Students from Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia, Chile, Ecuador, Venezuela, Guatemala, United States, Mexico, Canada, United Kingdom, Romania, France, Spain, Italy, Croatia, Slovakia, Germany, Kazakhstan, Moldova, Sweden, Denmark, Poland, Austria, Nigeria, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, South Korea and Mongolia met at the pub.As we spoke to one another they learned how similar the social problems are around the world and how we all face the same obstacles in solving those problems. Students found it motivating to learn that they were not alone. Networks for knowledge-sharing and support developed.On the night of Friday, March 29, the International School of Fundraising concluded with a gala dinner lit by candlelight. At the dinner, Morton Blackwell and Miguel Moreno of the Leadership Institute and Benjamin Harris-Quinney of the Bow group presented the Global Leadership Award, which recognizes exceptional work done by individuals around the world. This award is granted jointly by the Leadership Institute, the Bow Group, the World Congress of Families/ Howard Center for Family, Religion, and Society, and The Institut de Formation Politique. The Global Leadership Award embodies a non-partisan network of leaders who aim to bring ideas to power and to give power to ideas by stimulating dialogue and discussion about critical international conservative issues.During his speech, Morton Blackwell said, “We recognize and honor the unfaltering dedication of some remarkable individuals, who through their consistent faith, solid professionalism, and unwavering commitment to the conservative cause are making an international impact” and that “this joint award seeks to encourage the best forms of international engagement to meet the global challenges of the 21st century.“Recipients of the Global Leadership Award are: Nic Conner, Donna Edmunds, Samuel Kasumu, Karolina Vidovic Kristo, Pauline Fynn, Jack Chubb, Mark Eastham, Adryana Boyne, Marie-Noël Julienne, Eric Martin, Simon Cossiez, Adeyemi Ikuforiji, Sylva Ashimole, Juan Carlos Lazarte, Alexander Mooney, Lorenzo Montanari, Zeljko Zidaric, Amanda Sanchez, Luz Elena Delgado Flores, Ron Nehring, Oliver Cooper, Onyebuchi Monica Madiebo, Marco Respinti, Vanesa Anez, and Marcel Lazar.LI appreciates their contributions of time and talent to increase the number and effectiveness of conservative activists and leaders worldwide. It takes a special kind of person to be an activist. While most people might get angry and complain – these people decided to act. Not only did they see the problem, they found a solution. They acted.They are activists.Saturday, for those that left on later flights, was a day of sightseeing in London. From Big Ben to the London Eye, from Parliament to Westminster Cathedral and Westminster Abbey, thousands of pictures were taken with new friends. The overall goal of the training was not to feed delegates with a fish, but to teach them how to become extraordinary fishermen. The training that was provided is just the start. Betterment of the world comes from the work that activists do with the training. The world now has 108 newly empowered social entrepreneurs returning to their home countries, empowered, energized, and ready to make a difference! We wish each and every one of those activists the best of luck.>
The Civil Service: How to Cut Through the Bureaucracy
Justin Fiehrer
February 22, 2013
The Civil Service: How to Cut Through the Bureaucracy
The Leadership Institute hosted the first Civil Service Opportunity School in more than two years this past Tuesday and Wednesday evenings. The 24 students that attended learned a variety of things about the civil service including its history, how it works today, and what it takes to get a job in the government.The first lecture titled, “Why the Federal Government?” was taught by Mark Johnson, a supervisory IT specialist with the Department of Commerce. Mark discussed the hiring process, the roles of networking and tips to navigate your way through federal job searches.“The federal government has tremendous flexibility that allows you to move from one job to the next,” he said.The U.S. government is the largest employer in the nation which includes many career options and locations for potential employees to choose from.LI's 2006 Civil Service Opportunity School helped Mark get his current position. He said, “The Leadership Institute helped me move from Denver to DC, and then from the private sector to the civil service in 2008.” One of the Leadership Institute's interns this spring, Leah Courtney remarked on Mark's experience: “I really appreciated hearing his experience in the civil service and all the tricks of the trade he provided.”Terry Campo, who served as special assistant and chief of staff for the General Counsel of the U.S. Department of Energy during the Reagan Administration discussed the origins and purpose of the civil service.Terry explained the structures of executive agencies and the relationship between political appointees versus career employees. Terry commented on how political appointees and the employees under them are chosen.“It's supposed to be politically fair, but in reality it's not,” Terry said. One of the best resources is job directories where jobseekers can find the best person to contact regarding employment. Laura Turner, a current intern for Judicial Watch, thought his resources were helpful to her job search.“He was very helpful explaining how to tailor resumes. I will definitely be using his tips for future job searches,” Laura said.George Nesterchzuk, who served as a senior official in the Reagan Administration, talked about the political management and environment of the civil service. His best advice came on Wednesday night.“The civil service is protected by a very thick book of rules and regulations. My best advice is to get your application in to every opening there is in the federal government,” George advised.Eldon Girdner, who has more than a decade of service in the federal government, discussed the application process and navigating through it. He also talked about where and how to find jobs in the civil service.Eldon talked about how best to tailor resumes for federal jobs, and their differences from resumes for the private sector.“When searching for federal jobs, the more information you have on your resume the better because computers search through resumes and match up key words before they actually reach a person,” he explained.The students attending left the civil Service school with knowledge from faculty with years of service in the public sector. These students now know how to maneuver their way into a federal job and start tearing down the wall of bureaucracy.The Leadership Institute offers several career related workshops throughout the year. Go here to register for one. >
80 Conservatives Now Ready to be Campaign Managers!
Ulrik Boesen
February 15, 2013
80 Conservatives Now Ready to be Campaign Managers!
Last week 80 conservative activists gathered at the Leadership Institute headquarters for an intense four day Campaign Management School (CMS).Tea party leader from Charleston, South Carolina Dean Allen said, “I have been involved in politics since I was the Galveston County youth chairman for Barry Goldwater in the 1964 presidential race. I ran Ronald Reagan's GOTV operation in Galveston County. I consider myself an expert in politics who is well trained and knows the ropes very well. I was very pleasantly surprised at the quality of instruction, the broad scope of activities covered, and all the things I either did not know as in depth as I had thought; or, at the technology and newer methods that are more efficient. I learned a huge amount every day! I strongly recommend the educational programs of the Leadership Institute to any conservative activist who cares about the future of our republic and plans to be involved in the process of saving America.”Twenty-two of the nation's top political operatives served as volunteer faculty to these 80 aspiring campaigners. On day one Mike Rothfeld, president of SABER Communications, taught LI students the “Real Nature of Politics” and how to organize a campaign.Leah Holloway, a grassroots activist from Norfolk, Virginia said, “What a breath of fresh air! Rothfeld's delivery was awesome. His lecture was informative and truthful. I just can't get enough of this man! His insights make me question what I thought I already knew.” “ABCs of Polling,” lecture was taught by Tyler Harber, a partner with Harcom Strategies, where he described the purpose of polling and emphasized the importance of polling strategy.With 22 seasoned faculty, the lineup included: Mark Kelly, deputy chief of staff for Congressman Tim Huelskamp, who lectured about the importance of precinct organization; John Tate, president for Campaign for Liberty, who taught students the ins and outs about fundraising via direct mail; Terry Campo of The Campo Group who taught about opposition research; Edward King, director of programs & operations at Young Americans for Liberty, who spoke on different strategies for getting out the vote; Jordan Lieberman, president of CampaignGrid, who gave a great lecture on the newest campaign technology; Steve Sutton, former chief of staff to three freshmen Members of Congress and presently, LI's vice president of development, who spoke on message development; and many others.Elisabeth Jessop, currently a campaign manager, said, “I loved the lecture on developing your message by Steve Sutton. The four boxes was a great illustration of how to approach political opponents and how to create a positive message to your supporter!”The training saved the very best for last when Leadership Institute President Morton Blackwell lectured on the handling of negative information. Amazingly, students were still eager to learn more after four days of intensive training.Personhood Florida state coordinator Brenda Macmenamin said, “My favorite was Morton Blackwell just talking to us. To realize how much impact this one man has had was very encouraging!”To see photos of the week-long training, check out the pictures on Facebook here.LI's next Campaign Management School is the week of June 3. Go here to learn more and sign up. To see what other trainings LI offers, go here to see the upcoming schedule. >
LI's Career Services Is Here For You!
Alyssa Condrey
January 25, 2013
LI's Career Services Is Here For You!
Watch this video to learn about The Leadership Institute's Career Services. LI's Career Services offers:-ConservativeJobs.com, an interactive online job bank-Six specialized career trainings-Job fairs-Resume reviews-Candidate referrals The right jobs - The right staff – The right training –All right hereFollow us on Facebook, Twitter, and sign up on ConservativeJobs.com today! >
Making New Year Resolutions!
Carol Wehe
January 4, 2013
Making New Year Resolutions!
We were talking about New Year's resolutions in the office today, and aside from the regular ‘get in shape' resolutions, I heard a couple of great ideas. To help you think up a good list of resolutions, and then make it easy to keep them, I'll share a few ideas with you.* Become a great public speaker – For public speaking skills, practice is key. But, practice doesn't make perfect. You can just end up cementing bad habits and embarrassing yourself. So, start by learning from public speaking experts at the Leadership Institute's Public Speaking Workshop.*Change your community – Do you want to make a difference in your community, but don't know where to start or how to be effective? Go to the Leadership Institute's Youth Leadership School and Political Activism Trainings in your area to learn techniques from seasoned activists. *Be more tech savvy – The internet and smart phones are taking over our everyday lives. Learn to harness technology to make your voice heard online at LI's Online Activism and Strategy Trainings.*Run for local office – Sounds scary, huh? See if running for office is for you and learn how to be an effective candidate at the Leadership Institute's Future Candidate School. Learn from the experts – former candidates and consultants.*Pay the rent – You can't save the world if you can't pay the rent. Excel at raising funds in your current position, or get a job raising money for conservative orgs or campaigns. Learn how to effectively raise money at LI's Comprehensive Fundraising Training.Hope you enjoyed the holidays, and good luck with your 2013 New Year's resolutions! >
Apply Now for IHS Summer Seminars
Lauren Day
January 3, 2013
Apply Now for IHS Summer Seminars
This summer, the Institute for Humane Studies will offer nine college-level seminars on the foundations and future of freedom.Participants from around the world will explore market-based solutions to widespread problems, challenge status-quo academic thinking, and learn about ways to stand for freedom through a variety of career paths.Students and recent graduates are eligible.Learn more: www.TheIHS.org/summer-seminars.Students who apply by March 1 are eligible to receive a free book! >
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